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REPORT ON FACT FIDING MISSION FOR THE BUNGU/GANJI IDPs IN JUBA

REPORT ON FACT FINDING MISSION FOR THE BUNGU/GANJI IDPs IN JUBA

 

DATE: 10th February 2017, UPDATED ON 14th April 2017

 

BACKGROUND

 

In July 2016, there was the fighting that took place in Juba around the presidential palace pitying the SPLA/IG and the SPLA/IO presidential guards. The fighting quickly spread westwards of the city through the then official settlement of the SPLA/IO leader and his security team.

 

As calm returned to Juba, the SPLA/IG were pursuing the SPLA/IO fighters further west towards the Mundri – Yei – Maridi – Yambio into the DRC. Ganji and Bungu lie along the Juba – Yei road. At this particular time, Gnaji was hosting approximately 580 HH (From UNOCHA Assessment Report) of IDPs from Wonduruba who had earlier on been displaced due to conflict between the government forces and some armed groups in September 2015.

 

As the SPLA pursued the IO fighter through these areas, both the residents of Ganji and the IDPs from Wondruba got displace to Juba and Bungu. In November 2016, an SPLA senior officer travelling from Yei to Juba with 22 family members were attacked along the Yei – Juba road with some abducted and others got killed.

 

In response, SPLA/IG deployed to search for the missing family members and could not locate the abducted persons. On their way back to Juba, there was some violence in Bungu with 11 fatalities and the population displaced to Juba. RRC give the figure of displaced as 6912 (1152HH) from Bungu and 7726 (1287HH) from Ganji together with IDPs from Wonduruba. These IDPs are currently hosted by their relatives and friends around The Holy Trinity Church, Rejaf County of Jubek State.

 

Africa Life Aid carried out a fact finding assessment on the 10th of February 2017 upon request from the RRC during the HCF (Humanitarian Coordination Forum) meeting held on 26th of January 2017 for any agency willing to carry out the mission.

 

OBJECTIVE OF THE ASSESSMENT

 

To ascertain the humanitarian condition of the Bungu and Ganji IDPs living around the Holy

Trinity Church in Nyakuron West, Kator Payam, Juba, Jubek State

 

 

METHODOLOGY

 

Africa Life Aid visited the area and made physical observation of the living conditions in terms of access to basic services and the risks posed by environmental, economic and social factors. Interviews  were  carried  out  at  random  with different  members  and heads  of  households, women, youths and some members of the host community. A meeting with the stakeholders, government officials, youth, community and religious leaders was carried out to obtain the background information and future plans among other elements concerning humanitarian situation. In the meeting were the following persons:

 

  • Commissioner of Bungu County.
  • Commissioner of Ganji County.
  • Executive Administrator.
  • 2 paramount Chiefs.
  • 1 sub Chief.
  • 2 Church leaders.
  • Advisor for Religious Affairs Rev. Thomas Kedini,
  • 8 Members of Mothers union
  • 4 youth leaders.
  • 2 staff from Africa Life Aid.

 

For the education matters, the following persons were interviewed and they guided a tour of the school compound to ascertain the environmental condition

 

  • Noel Jugar: Acting Head Teacher of Libito primary school.
  • Remis Mori Laku: Teacher & former director of Bungu primary school
  • 4 Pupils from the school

 

KEY FINDINGS

 

There has been no intervention since their displacement. Apart from the general population, the team also isolated PSNs and their number is as tabulated below.

 

Table 1:  BUNGU IDPs PSNs

 

Categories Male Female Total Comment
Elderly 59 93 152 Above 60’s
Orphans 27 20 47 Below 18 years

 

Pregnant & Lactating

Mothers

60 60
Physically Challenge 26 17 43 Blinds, lame, deaf, etc (40 among them

being elderly 10 F 30M)

Widows 39 39 Head of households
TOTAL 341 PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Table 2:  GANJI IDPs PSNs

 

Category Male Female Total Remark
Elderly 137 173 310 Above 60’s
Orphans 60 52 112 Below 18 years
Pregnant and Lactating Mothers 176 176
Physically Challenge 10 11 21 Blind, Lame, Deaf etc
Widows 15 15 Head of Household
TOTAL 634 PERSONS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Food Security and livelihoods

 

No household  was able  to move with their harvest  and all food  sources  have since been destroyed, goats /sheep driven away by armed groups.

 

IDPs are currently surviving on goodwill from the host community which is already overwhelmed by the current cost of food. Children are at high risk of malnutrition if the food situation is not addressed on time.

 

Preparation for the coming season is uncertain as most farming households will remain in displaced during the cultivation/planting season. This will further limit their access to food in

2017/8.

 

Shelter and NFIs

 

The IDPs are mostly housed by the host communities in shared tukuls (huts) which are basically congested. Men sleep at the church while others spent the night outside. Given the rush with which they left their house, all the household items including beddings, clothes, cooking utensil and other personal items were left behind and later looted or destroyed by the armed groups.

 

Health / Medication

 

The Nyakuron PHCU is located about 2km towards Juba and they are able to access the facility. However, this health facility is congested and only diagnosis is carried out and patients provided with prescription to purchase own medicines. This limits their access to medication.

 

 

Education

 

There is a school within that is run by The Holy Trinity church that pupils from both the host and IDPs community attend. The facility cannot accommodate all the pupils at the same time and the school now operates in two shifts with different names as shown below.

 

Table 3: Pupils mode of learning

 

Shift School Name Shift Time Number of Pupils Teachers Pupils catchment
Boys Girls total
Rejaf Diocese model Nursery and Primary school 8.00am to 12:30pm 297 356 653 (16)

11 Male

&

5 female

Host community& IDPs
Libito primary school 1.00pm to 5.30pm 147 203 350 (11)

8 Male

&

3 Female

IDPs from Wondruba,

Ganj and Bungu

1003 27

 

 

 

The school fee structures vary from class to class for the whole year as illustrated in the table below. The church takes 30% from this amount and the 70% is used by the school for running its administrative cost like purchasing teaching materials and other administrative needs and it is also used for settling teachers’ salaries.

 

Morning Session classes and their school fee structures (Rejaf Diocese Primary school) Host

 

S/No. Class School Fee Structure Per Year (SSP)
01 Nursery 1850
02 Primary one – Primary Two 2000
03 Primary Three –Primary Four 2200
04 Primary Five –Primary Six 2400
05 Primary Seven–Primary Eight 2600

Evening Session Classes and their school fee structures (Libito Primary School) IDPs

 

S/No. Class School Fee Structure Per Year (SSP)
01 Primary one – Primary Two 1500
02 Primary Three –Primary Four 1800
03 Primary Five –Primary Six 2000

 

 

 

 

The collection from the school fees cannot sufficiently cater for the needs hence the following challenges;

 

Table 4: Challenges faced by pupils and teachers at the school

 

Challenges faced by the pupils Challenges faced by teachers
§    Rampant interruptions of classes as pupils are sent home for unpaid school fees. Most parents do not have a reliable

source of income.

§    Lack of sufficient scholastic materials for attending classes.

§    No proper school dressing.

§    Insufficient food at home leading to weakness/malnutrition, lack of concentration and absenteeism.

§    Lack of sitting desks during lessons.

§    Very dusty playing ground that exposes pupils to respiratory tract infections.

§    There are no playing facilities

§    Ladies faces challenges in their hygiene management so require dignity kits.

§    Low payment of salaries which mostly comes from the collection of school fees.

§    Delay in the payment of salaries as parents are IDPs with no income generating activities.

§    Lack of teaching support materials

like text books, pieces of chalk, lesson preparation book, charts etc.

§    Low number of teachers as many left the teaching due to low remunerations.

§    Low morale, cannot afford a meal while on duty, challenges in travelling to school for teachers residing far from school

§    Lack of support from local government in terms of recognitions.

 

 

 

Further, most of the IDPs cannot afford the school fees charged given their loss of livelihood. Scholastic materials are also not affordable given other pressing priorities.

 

WASH

 

The area of residence looked unkempt, personal hygiene levels wanting and the general waste management, like in any other congested area, looked bad. With the wet season approaching, fear of cholera and other hygiene related infections is real.

 

Low toilet coverage and there is evidence of widespread open defecation especially along the dry river bed. However, for the school, ADRA is already doing some intervention with following activities:

 

 

1-   The construction of one block of latrine the is currently helping in the hygiene promotion

2-    Drilled a borehole and installed a hand pump

3-   Built a child friendly space (CFS) with facilities around.

4-   Currently erecting wire mess fence around the school.

 

Protection

 

From the interviews and meetings with the IDPs, they indicated willingness to return. However, the security situation remains a threat. Issues arising on protection include:

 

  • Restriction of movement in and out of Bungu and Ganji
  • Lack of attention to PSN such as PLW-HIV may no longer access the ARVs
  • Poor shelters that may expose the weak to harsh weather.
  • Girls who  cannot  access  education  anymore  risk  being  married  off  or  engage  in commercial sex exposing themselves to HIV/Aids.
  • Boys fear being victimised as belonging to rebel groups
  • Lack of food and education may force children from this particular group to move to the streets as beggars.
  • Affected children, women and men have no access to psycho social support services and may lead to depression, suicides.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

  • Provide protection  services  (identify  PSNs,  monitor  elements  of  general  and  child protection)
  • Provide food assistance and introduce feeding programme at the school especially for the

350 IDP pupils

  • Engage the  children  in  productive  activities  within  the  church  premises  including provision of playing and learning facilities
  • Comprehensive humanitarian  assessment  to  ascertain  immediate/critical  needs  and more so for people with special needs and children under 5years.
  • Advocacy / lobbying through the existing structures for improvement of security in the two counties as a pullback factor to return process
  • Provision of scholastic materials to pupils like books, pens etc
  • Provision of teaching aid to the teachers and the school and some incentive to boost morale.

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REPORT ON FACT FIDING MISSION FOR THE BUNGU/GANJI IDPs IN JUBA

REPORT ON FACT FINDING MISSION FOR THE BUNGU/GANJI IDPs IN JUBA

 

DATE: 10th February 2017, UPDATED ON 14th April 2017

 

BACKGROUND

 

In July 2016, there was the fighting that took place in Juba around the presidential palace pitying the SPLA/IG and the SPLA/IO presidential guards. The fighting quickly spread westwards of the city through the then official settlement of the SPLA/IO leader and his security team.

 

As calm returned to Juba, the SPLA/IG were pursuing the SPLA/IO fighters further west towards the Mundri – Yei – Maridi – Yambio into the DRC. Ganji and Bungu lie along the Juba – Yei road. At this particular time, Gnaji was hosting approximately 580 HH (From UNOCHA Assessment Report) of IDPs from Wonduruba who had earlier on been displaced due to conflict between the government forces and some armed groups in September 2015.

 

As the SPLA pursued the IO fighter through these areas, both the residents of Ganji and the IDPs from Wondruba got displace to Juba and Bungu. In November 2016, an SPLA senior officer travelling from Yei to Juba with 22 family members were attacked along the Yei – Juba road with some abducted and others got killed.

 

In response, SPLA/IG deployed to search for the missing family members and could not locate the abducted persons. On their way back to Juba, there was some violence in Bungu with 11 fatalities and the population displaced to Juba. RRC give the figure of displaced as 6912 (1152HH) from Bungu and 7726 (1287HH) from Ganji together with IDPs from Wonduruba. These IDPs are currently hosted by their relatives and friends around The Holy Trinity Church, Rejaf County of Jubek State.

 

Africa Life Aid carried out a fact finding assessment on the 10th of February 2017 upon request from the RRC during the HCF (Humanitarian Coordination Forum) meeting held on 26th of January 2017 for any agency willing to carry out the mission.

 

OBJECTIVE OF THE ASSESSMENT

 

To ascertain the humanitarian condition of the Bungu and Ganji IDPs living around the Holy

Trinity Church in Nyakuron West, Kator Payam, Juba, Jubek State

 

 

METHODOLOGY

 

Africa Life Aid visited the area and made physical observation of the living conditions in terms of access to basic services and the risks posed by environmental, economic and social factors. Interviews  were  carried  out  at  random  with different  members  and heads  of  households, women, youths and some members of the host community. A meeting with the stakeholders, government officials, youth, community and religious leaders was carried out to obtain the background information and future plans among other elements concerning humanitarian situation. In the meeting were the following persons:

 

  • Commissioner of Bungu County.
  • Commissioner of Ganji County.
  • Executive Administrator.
  • 2 paramount Chiefs.
  • 1 sub Chief.
  • 2 Church leaders.
  • Advisor for Religious Affairs Rev. Thomas Kedini,
  • 8 Members of Mothers union
  • 4 youth leaders.
  • 2 staff from Africa Life Aid.

 

For the education matters, the following persons were interviewed and they guided a tour of the school compound to ascertain the environmental condition

 

  • Noel Jugar: Acting Head Teacher of Libito primary school.
  • Remis Mori Laku: Teacher & former director of Bungu primary school
  • 4 Pupils from the school

 

KEY FINDINGS

 

There has been no intervention since their displacement. Apart from the general population, the team also isolated PSNs and their number is as tabulated below.

 

Table 1:  BUNGU IDPs PSNs

 

Categories Male Female Total Comment
Elderly 59 93 152 Above 60’s
Orphans 27 20 47 Below 18 years

 

Pregnant & Lactating

Mothers

60 60
Physically Challenge 26 17 43 Blinds, lame, deaf, etc (40 among them

being elderly 10 F 30M)

Widows 39 39 Head of households
TOTAL 341 PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Table 2:  GANJI IDPs PSNs

 

Category Male Female Total Remark
Elderly 137 173 310 Above 60’s
Orphans 60 52 112 Below 18 years
Pregnant and Lactating Mothers 176 176
Physically Challenge 10 11 21 Blind, Lame, Deaf etc
Widows 15 15 Head of Household
TOTAL 634 PERSONS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Food Security and livelihoods

 

No household  was able  to move with their harvest  and all food  sources  have since been destroyed, goats /sheep driven away by armed groups.

 

IDPs are currently surviving on goodwill from the host community which is already overwhelmed by the current cost of food. Children are at high risk of malnutrition if the food situation is not addressed on time.

 

Preparation for the coming season is uncertain as most farming households will remain in displaced during the cultivation/planting season. This will further limit their access to food in

2017/8.

 

Shelter and NFIs

 

The IDPs are mostly housed by the host communities in shared tukuls (huts) which are basically congested. Men sleep at the church while others spent the night outside. Given the rush with which they left their house, all the household items including beddings, clothes, cooking utensil and other personal items were left behind and later looted or destroyed by the armed groups.

 

Health / Medication

 

The Nyakuron PHCU is located about 2km towards Juba and they are able to access the facility. However, this health facility is congested and only diagnosis is carried out and patients provided with prescription to purchase own medicines. This limits their access to medication.

 

 

Education

 

There is a school within that is run by The Holy Trinity church that pupils from both the host and IDPs community attend. The facility cannot accommodate all the pupils at the same time and the school now operates in two shifts with different names as shown below.

 

Table 3: Pupils mode of learning

 

Shift School Name Shift Time Number of Pupils Teachers Pupils catchment
Boys Girls total
Rejaf Diocese model Nursery and Primary school 8.00am to 12:30pm 297 356 653 (16)

11 Male

&

5 female

Host community& IDPs
Libito primary school 1.00pm to 5.30pm 147 203 350 (11)

8 Male

&

3 Female

IDPs from Wondruba,

Ganj and Bungu

1003 27

 

 

 

The school fee structures vary from class to class for the whole year as illustrated in the table below. The church takes 30% from this amount and the 70% is used by the school for running its administrative cost like purchasing teaching materials and other administrative needs and it is also used for settling teachers’ salaries.

 

Morning Session classes and their school fee structures (Rejaf Diocese Primary school) Host

 

S/No. Class School Fee Structure Per Year (SSP)
01 Nursery 1850
02 Primary one – Primary Two 2000
03 Primary Three –Primary Four 2200
04 Primary Five –Primary Six 2400
05 Primary Seven–Primary Eight 2600

Evening Session Classes and their school fee structures (Libito Primary School) IDPs

 

S/No. Class School Fee Structure Per Year (SSP)
01 Primary one – Primary Two 1500
02 Primary Three –Primary Four 1800
03 Primary Five –Primary Six 2000

 

 

 

 

The collection from the school fees cannot sufficiently cater for the needs hence the following challenges;

 

Table 4: Challenges faced by pupils and teachers at the school

 

Challenges faced by the pupils Challenges faced by teachers
§    Rampant interruptions of classes as pupils are sent home for unpaid school fees. Most parents do not have a reliable

source of income.

§    Lack of sufficient scholastic materials for attending classes.

§    No proper school dressing.

§    Insufficient food at home leading to weakness/malnutrition, lack of concentration and absenteeism.

§    Lack of sitting desks during lessons.

§    Very dusty playing ground that exposes pupils to respiratory tract infections.

§    There are no playing facilities

§    Ladies faces challenges in their hygiene management so require dignity kits.

§    Low payment of salaries which mostly comes from the collection of school fees.

§    Delay in the payment of salaries as parents are IDPs with no income generating activities.

§    Lack of teaching support materials

like text books, pieces of chalk, lesson preparation book, charts etc.

§    Low number of teachers as many left the teaching due to low remunerations.

§    Low morale, cannot afford a meal while on duty, challenges in travelling to school for teachers residing far from school

§    Lack of support from local government in terms of recognitions.

 

 

 

Further, most of the IDPs cannot afford the school fees charged given their loss of livelihood. Scholastic materials are also not affordable given other pressing priorities.

 

WASH

 

The area of residence looked unkempt, personal hygiene levels wanting and the general waste management, like in any other congested area, looked bad. With the wet season approaching, fear of cholera and other hygiene related infections is real.

 

Low toilet coverage and there is evidence of widespread open defecation especially along the dry river bed. However, for the school, ADRA is already doing some intervention with following activities:

 

 

1-   The construction of one block of latrine the is currently helping in the hygiene promotion

2-    Drilled a borehole and installed a hand pump

3-   Built a child friendly space (CFS) with facilities around.

4-   Currently erecting wire mess fence around the school.

 

Protection

 

From the interviews and meetings with the IDPs, they indicated willingness to return. However, the security situation remains a threat. Issues arising on protection include:

 

  • Restriction of movement in and out of Bungu and Ganji
  • Lack of attention to PSN such as PLW-HIV may no longer access the ARVs
  • Poor shelters that may expose the weak to harsh weather.
  • Girls who  cannot  access  education  anymore  risk  being  married  off  or  engage  in commercial sex exposing themselves to HIV/Aids.
  • Boys fear being victimised as belonging to rebel groups
  • Lack of food and education may force children from this particular group to move to the streets as beggars.
  • Affected children, women and men have no access to psycho social support services and may lead to depression, suicides.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

  • Provide protection  services  (identify  PSNs,  monitor  elements  of  general  and  child protection)
  • Provide food assistance and introduce feeding programme at the school especially for the

350 IDP pupils

  • Engage the  children  in  productive  activities  within  the  church  premises  including provision of playing and learning facilities
  • Comprehensive humanitarian  assessment  to  ascertain  immediate/critical  needs  and more so for people with special needs and children under 5years.
  • Advocacy / lobbying through the existing structures for improvement of security in the two counties as a pullback factor to return process
  • Provision of scholastic materials to pupils like books, pens etc
  • Provision of teaching aid to the teachers and the school and some incentive to boost morale.

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